DIY – Crochet Doughnuts and Cookies

Blog thumbnail - DIY Crochet Doughnuts and cookiesThis is probably my last crochet project for a while. The weather is getting better and I am running out of yarn.  Unless a really cool project comes my way, of course! But how awesome are these crochet doughnuts and cookies?!

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There were definitely more, but as it took a few days to make (not necessarily consequent few days), the cookies disappeared… I think someone might have eaten them! Before I started, I read several patterns and even tried a couple, and there were some excellent tutorials and some fails that have wasted some of my time, rather needlessly. However ~ never a failure, always a lesson ~ I have learned from each fail and made some delicious yummies!

When making amigurumies years ago and more recentrly the cactii garden, I’ve learned a thing or two about crochet. I have learned how shapes behave with different rates of increasing and decreasing.  I understood what makes a ball or a circle.  All the deserts are based on that principle. Once you figure that out, you don’t even have to follow a pattern.

To make it available for you, if you want dessert exactly like mine, with my modifications, here are my patters:

*Note, I used hook No. 2.5 for all my crochet food, and yarn that indicates to use hook 3-3.5. This gave some sturdiness to the pieces.

Oreo Cookie

Make 2 with dark brown yarn and 1 with white yarn for each oreo.

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Rnd 1 – Work 13 dc’s into 3rd ch from hook. Join. (14 as last two ch count as one dc). Pull the end yarn tight, pulling dc’s into a tight circle.

Rnd 2 – Ch 2. Dc into the same st. Work 2 dc’s into each next st. Join (28)

Fasten off and weave in the ends. Alternatively you could leave one 40 cm end on one of the brown circles for sewing later.

Lay white circle between two brown circles. Sew them together going up and down through the loops.
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Alternatively, make lilac Oreos. Maybe it will catch on. My daughter asked me what flavour they were, and I said “pretend flavour”. She accepted that.SAM_8158

Chocolate chip cookie

With light brown yarn:

Ch 3

Rnd 1 – Work 6 sc’s into 3rd ch from hook. Join. (6)

Rnd 2 – Work 2 sc’s into each. (12) Do not worry about joining as this is worked as a spiral.

Rnd 3 – Work 2 sc’s into the next st, followed by 1 sc into the next st. Repeat to the end. (18)

Rnd 4 – Work 2 sc’s into the next st, followed by 1 sc into the next two st. Repeat to the end. (24)

Rnd 5 – Work 2 sc’s into the next st, followed by 1 sc into the next three st. Repeat to the end. (30)

Rnd 6 – Work sc into each st. (30)

Rnd 7 – Work sc2tog, followed by 1 sc into the next three st. Repeat to the end. (24)

Rnd 8 – Work sc2tog, followed by 1 sc into the next two st. Repeat to the end. (18)

Rnd 9 – Work sc2tog, followed by 1 sc into the next st. Repeat to the end. (12)

Rnd 10 – Work sc2tog all way round. (6)

Collect all together with one sc. Fasten off and weave in the ends. Decorate with chocolate chip (or white chocolate chip).
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Doughnuts

With light brown yarn:

Ch 18

Rnd 1 – Work 1 sc into each st. (18). Do not worry about joining as this is worked as a spiral.

Rnd 2 – Work 2 sc’s into each next st. (36)

Rnd 3 – Work 1 sc into each st. (36)

Rnd 4 – Work 2 sc’s into the next st, followed by 1 sc into the next st. Repeat to the end. (54)

Rnd 5 – Work 1 sc into each st. (54)

Rnd 6 – Work 2 sc’s into the next st, followed by 1 sc into the next two st. Repeat to the end. (72)

Rnd 7 – Work 1 sc into each st. (72)

Rnd 8 – Work 2 sc’s into the next st, followed by 1 sc into the next three st. Repeat to the end. (90)

Rnd 9 – Work sc into each st. (90)

Rnd 10 – Work sc2tog, followed by 1 sc into the next three st. Repeat to the end. (72)

Rnd 11 – Work 1 sc into each st. (72)

Rnd 12 – Work sc2tog, followed by 1 sc into the next two st. Repeat to the end. (54)

Rnd 13 – Work 1 sc into each st. (54)

Rnd 14 – Work sc2tog, followed by 1 sc into the next st. Repeat to the end. (36)

Rnd 15 – Work 1 sc into each st. (36)

Rnd 16 – Work sc2tog all way round. (18)

Leave the ends for sewing in the hole.

You should have something that looks like this:

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Sew half the the openings together, stuff with polyfill, sew the rest.

Frosting

With pink/white/purple yarn:

Ch 18

Rnd 1 – Work 1 sc into each st. (18). Do not worry about joining as this is worked as a spiral.

Rnd 2 – Work 2 sc’s into each next st. (36)

Rnd 3 – Work 1 sc into each st. (36)

Rnd 4 – Work 2 sc’s into the next st, followed by 1 sc into the next st. Repeat to the end. (54)

Rnd 5 – Work 1 sc into each st. (54)

Rnd 6 – Work 2 sc’s into the next st, followed by 1 sc into the next two st. Repeat to the end. (72)

Rnd 7 – Work 1 sc into each st. (72)

Rnd 8 – Work 2 sc’s into the next st, followed by 1 sc into the next three st. Repeat to the end. (90)

Rnd 9 – Create flow effect by going through the sequence of *1 or 2 sl st, 1 or 2 sc, 1 or 2 hc, 1 or 2 dc, 1 or 2 hc, 1 or 2 sc* giving it different variations.

Leave the ends for sewing around the hole and along the circumference. Sew onto the doughnut.

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Decorate with sprinkles.

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Sprinkles make all the difference!

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Can’t stop little hands! My little ones were very excited to play with these. I am very excited to play with these!

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One last photo before kids devour them!

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Make it and love it!

If you enjoyed this crochet craft, I have some other recommendations for you:

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DIY – Crochet Viking Hat

Blog thumbnail - DIY Crochet Viking Hat

I was so excited to come across this ridiculously cute Viking Hat! Just so happens that the pattern was crazy affordable and I had all the yarn and hooks that I needed! I made two (I am a serial crocheter now!) and I can’t get over how easy they are and how effective! Who comes up with these patterns? That’s talent!

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The hat looks like a Viking Helmet, with some really cute detail and bobbles made using “popcorn” stitch.

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On either side of the hat are adorable cow horns! Fierce! They are sewed on separately.

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The hat starts at the top with a loop!

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At the moment, the truth is painful – my son who normally loves hats, refuses to wear this hat. Seeing her mummy’s disappointment, my daughter has stepped in and was more than happy to model! Thank you, my viking princess!

Viking Hat

Make it and love it! And then make it again!

If you enjoyed this post, check our my other recommended posts:

Blog thumbnail - DIY Crochet Collar  Blog thumbnail - DIY Chrochet Succelent Garden  Blog thumbnail - DIY Dollhouse crochet rug

DIY – Crochet Collar

Blog thumbnail - DIY Crochet Collar

Although craft has always been part of my life, it has always involved doing something creative for something or someone else. In school it was either part of a curriculum or extra-curricular activity.  I remember doing logo for our puppet theatre in school, or being the editor of our college newsletter, or decorating friends’ parties – it was never really just for me. It was always more reactive that proactive. Something needed to be done, let’s get Olga to do it. And while I love getting involved in things like this, it was always directed by someone other than me.

Then one day, I went to a shop, bought myself some yarn and crochet hooks, and learned how to crochet. This was purely for me. No other reason than just me, acquiring a new skill. Whatever I would do with that skill was irrelevant. Crochet was a medium for expressing creativity and I wanted to create, so I taught myself how to crochet.

Today, I am super glad it is something I know how to do, because Cyprus weather has been rather nasty, and crochet proved to be an excellent antidote to bad weather! It is easy, quick and you can pause at any moment (whether that’s pausing your life, or pausing crochet, I don’t know)!

Beginner crochet level + rainy weather = this pretty crochet collar for my daughter!

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It only took me one evening while watching “Come, Dine with me” with my hubby. There is a wonderful tutorial here, do check it out, it is one of the best! I am definitely keeping it bookmarked! The author of the tutorial takes you stitch by stitch through the making of the collar, the petals and these adorable little flowers.

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The front:SAM_8053

The back:

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How dreamy is that?

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To my usual “Make it and love it!” I have to add – I made it, but it is my little girl that absolutely loved it!

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DIY – Giant Growth Chart

Blog thumbnail - DIY Giant Growth Chart

Rental, sweet rental!  Since our wedding in 2007, my husband and I have moved in and out of 5 rented accommodations. Moving in, each time, we would think this is for a long time, but as it happens, 5 houses in 7 years.

Decorating rented accommodation is rather daunting. Whenever we painted walls, we would have to repaint. If we made a shed or a fence, we would have to leave it behind. I think now I am learning, that whatever you make, however you decorate, it has to be mobile or removable.  That’s why this is such a great post for all the folk out there renting! Kid’s heights have to be measured, and you can’t really take a door post with you every time you move.

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It was very easy to make. Boards this size are sold at any DIY store. This one cost me 7 euro.

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The board was stained. I sort of carved in some measurements and stenciled numbers with tippex. Tippex covered better than white paint, dried very quickly and had a very nice uneven texture to it.

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We use metric system in Cyprus, so naturally I used metres. Start with 50cm and go up to 1.6m. Parhaps my children will grow taller than that… I will have to make an extension. Look out for that post in a few years.

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An easy and quick craft that has been and will be part of our family’s history.

If you enjoyed this, perhaps you would enjoy my earlier posts, too:

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DIY – Crochet Succulent Garden

Blog thumbnail - DIY Chrochet Succelent GardenThe other day I went to Fasouliotis (the local shop where I buy my supplies) and I could hardly fit through the yarn isle. Not so much because of all those lovely Christmas kilos, but because there were so many other ladies panting for some wool! And its not surprising – its cold and rainy outside, warm and cosy inside – perfect setting for some knitting and crocheting. This is what I came up with!

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And it could not be easier! If your are new to crochet, this is a really easy first time craft to try. It is impossible to mess up as there is no right or wrong way to do it, and it looks great, too!SAM_8020

I am not as proficient in crochet as I would like to be, but I know how to chain, make single and double stitches and increases and decreases.  I found simple instructions here, which gives you the real basic free pattern for a round cactus. Sure, its in Danish, but it has numbers and really, that’s all you need! You quickly learn how to make perfect round cacti or longer ones. There are plenty of other tutorials online, so I wont burden you with my interpretation of them. You just have to play around, that’s all!

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After playing with different colours and shapes, I had enough to work on an arrangement.

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Oh, and then there are flowers. The instructions are on the same site as the pattern for cactus.

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It just so happened that I had a lot of different green and pink yarn, so I could actually make a good colour variety for my succulents.

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I had five different green colours, three pink and one white. I also needed some dark brown to make a long base for my succulent garden.

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Saw it on and its ready!

I love it that it’s something my kiddos can play with and I don’t need to water it!

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The end result:10922247_10152562271546120_1152704685_nMake it and love it!

If you, too, enjoy some crafting, check out my other related posts:

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DIY – Pompom Chandelier

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Just before Christmas, I posted about making a DIY Pompom Wreath. That’s when I realised how fun pompoms are – it’s in the name! They are fun, easy and quick to make, and look so playful! I did make pompoms previously for all sorts of other purposes, but when I had to make couple dozen for the Christmas wreath, I fell in love with the idea of a pile of pompoms. It was so cool to have many pompoms, that I’ve decided to make something else, using a pile of pompoms. This wonderful chandelier was the result!

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As usual, when making something for my kids’ room, I have the challenge of creating it in unisex colours, as my boy and girl share a room. I often go for neutral colours, greys, whites, beige… But when I went to Fasouliotis (local yarn shop), yarn was available in so many vibrant colours, it would a pity to forgo such an opportunity. So I went for loud yellow, raspberry pink, soft blue and quieter tones of grey and white.
Pompom chandelier

For a chandelier like this, you will need 6 larger sized pompoms, 18 medium sized ones and 18 little pompoms. Colours varied for different sizes.

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From one ball of yarn, you can get approximately one or two large pompoms, three or four medium ones, and five to six small pompoms. I used 6 balls of yarn, just like the one in the picture above.  As it is not for wearing, the quality of wool is of no consequence, so I bought mostly acrylic yarn for 1.20 euro each (for some odd reason, grey was on 20% sale on top of that).

The pompoms then have to be arranged as shown below:

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I had a cheap lampshade that I bought from IKEA’s discounted section and stripped it of whatever was on it. Additionally I made a wire ring, which both served as a skeleton for my pompoms to go on.
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This is how the pompoms were arranged. Each “leg” was made by stringing pompons and rings together.  Starting with a small pompom, followed by two medium and then one large pompom. Then there was the big ring, another medium pompom, two small pompoms and the other ring. SAM_7950

The metal rings were wrapped with light grey yarn to make them look like an intentional part of this composition.

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I didn’t have any pattern to the way colours were arranged, because I do like some unpredictability. And if something were to go wrong, it would be easier to fix. So in a way its a planned chaos. SAM_7957

I did have be careful with keeping all sides equal in length to balance it, so I did do my final tweaking with a glue gun.SAM_7960

The end result is pretty cool. The real surprise came when I put the light on – the shadows cast by the chandelier were pretty cool!

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A funky chandelier that looks great during the day and night – pretty awesome.

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Make it and love it!

If you too enjoy DIYs with pompoms or yarn, here are a couple of suggestions:

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